Krishi Desh

For Bharat and Bharati

Posts Tagged ‘suicides cases’

SC worried about Farmer’s Suicides due to Starvation, Poverty & Indebtedness; But GOI isn’t

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on January 22, 2010


Expressing serious concern over the increasing incidents of suicide by farmers due to starvation, poverty and other reasons, the Supreme Court issued directive to Centre to come out with “mirco-level steps to prevent such suicides”. This directive came in on Monday, 18 Jan, 2010.

Take micro-level steps to prevent farmers’ suicides: SC

What a tragedy, court needs to direct, so called socialists and social workers, about the farmers problems…

The Chief Justice told the counsel the problem differed from area to area.  “It needs to be addressed at the local level. Farmers often go to money-lenders as they give money without security. You tell us what the schemes are or packages you have for farmers, whether these schemes reach the farmers, and how far it has reduced indebtedness. You should also collect the latest data,” he said….

Why don’t these politicians, who go to farmers and labors to seek their votes, understand the pain farmers suffer? Or is it that they don’t want to acknowledge? The local representatives are so engraved in selfish and corrupt acts that they turned diff and dumb towards the problems of common man. These are the same selfish, greedy creatures who become angels and god/goddess in election days.

The CJI also asked the petitioner to come out with suggestions so that the court could give some positive directions to the government on the next date of hearing after six weeks….

Why is government elected?  Is this what for people elected government? I suspect the government has re-elected itself (May be EVM scam). Because as I see this government has failed in each aspect.

No security, No law, No food, Farmers & students are committing suicide. Textile mill workers have been fighting for 28 years to get their rights but no success. Vidharbha(farmer suicide epicenter) economic/developmental backlog of 1994 is still not completed (expected to complete by 2012). No developments on food, water crisis.

“All is well, because we don’t care”

Are they, elected representatives, unable to handle the issues? If that is the case then they have no right to stay in power.  Please, pave way to able and efficient leadership..

No channel, newspaper talk about such issues. (Who owns these media houses?)

No expert is needed to answer these questions. It is just that we have week opposition party and sleeping citizens..

जय भारत!

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Farmer Suicides Continues….

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on January 16, 2010


I’m starting a series of posts (One for each month) where these posts will contain the news of suicides by farmers. I will stop publishing these posts once the suicides are stopped completely. Most of the farmer suicides are due to crop failure, debt,  bureaucratic torture, likewise state and center policy victims. I hope to stop such posts at the earliest.
Here is the reporting for Jan 2010:

Bakura: A farmer poisoned to death his wife and children by serving them with poison-laced food before eating the same and committing suicide in Taldangra, Bankura, on Sunday night.

It was debt and poverty which led Debdulal Ghosh, a habitual gambler, to take the extreme step, said police. The other deceased have been identified as Bandana Ghosh (38), Seema (16) and Subhankar (8).

“Ghosh’s body was recovered from a field near his house this afternoon. Primary investigations have revealed that poverty and debt led to the incident,” said Bankura SP Vishal Garg.

….

Hubli: A farmer in Shanwad village of Navalgund taluk in Dharwad district of Karnataka allegedly committed suicide by hanging himself, frustrated as he was unable to repay a loan, police said today.

The farmer, identified as Rachayya Hiremath (48), had taken a loan of Rs two lakh in State Bank of India (SBI), another Rs two lakh from private financers and Rs 6000 from a Cooperative Bank for agricultural operations and to conduct the marriage of his daughter.

But due to crop loss following unseasonal heavy rains, he could not repay the loan

>> Davangere farmer ends life, 19 Jan 2010

DAVANGERE: A farmer on learning that his land pledged with a private financier, had been sold to someone else, committed suicide at Hadadi village, about 18 km from here, on Sunday.

According to the police, Ningappa had pledged 3.7 acres of land with the financier here. He approached the financier saying that he would clear the interest that was due and that he be allowed to cultivate the land. But the financier told Ningappa that the land had been sold. Following this, the farmer consumed poison and died.

>> Farmer commits suicide in Sundargarh, 16 Jan 2010

Rourkela: A debt-ridden farmer committed suicide by consuming pesticide in Orissa’s Sundergarh, taking the toll of such peasants to six in the district.
Khiti Bhushan Kumura (45) of Darlipalli village in Tangarpalli block of the district took the extreme step yesterday, police said.
Kumura, father of three children, ended his life due to loan burden and crop loss, his wife Ambika said.
She told police that her husband had taken a loan of Rs 19,000 from a nationalised bank in 2008 and again Rs 28,000 from a village cooperative and invested in kharif and rabi crops.
But the kharif crops were damaged due to scanty rainfall while the rabi crops were lost due to pest attack, she said, adding Kumura was disturbed for the past one week after receiving a notice from the bank for repayment of loan.

>> One Farmer Reportedly Commits Suicide, 15 Jan 2010

Sundergarh : Another farmer suicide happened in Sundergarh district. A farmer namely Chaitu Kumuda of Sardipalli area of this district has committed suicide by taking pesticide. He were taken to the hospital but the doctor declared him dead. Earlier five farmer alleged suicide in the district. Now the farmer suicide in the district toll is six.

Bidar, 13 Jan 2010.

BIDAR: In the continuing saga of farmers’ suicides, another debt-ridden farmer of Chillargi village in Bidar taluka committed suicide by hanging on Monday night. According to reports, farmer Sanjeev Vishwanath (30) was found hanging from the ceiling of his house by his family members. The farmer is survived by his wife and two children.

A case has been registered at the Janwada Police Station.

>> Farmer suicide (Pesticide Kills another farmer), 5 Jan 2010

CHICKABALLAPUR: A debt-ridden farmer committed suicide by consuming pesticide in Gauribidanur taluk of Chickaballapur district. The police said Sreenivasa (38) of Hirebidanur village consumed pesticide on Saturday night. He was rushed to a hospital in Bangalore but he died there on Sunday. Sreenivasa, who had cultivated marigold, is said to have incurred a debt of around Rs. 2.5 lakh.

>> Admn probing Rourkela suicide, 02 Jan 2010

ROURKELA: An administrative inquiry into suicide of a young loanee farmer Guru Charan Naik is yet to arrive at any conclusion.

Naik, a marginal farmer of village Kirei in Sundargarh Sadar block, consumed poison on Monday afternoon. Investigation revealed on the fateful day, Naik had left his house in the forenoon. On return, he requested a motor-cyclist to drop him at his house and on the way he told the motor-cyclist that he consumed poison. Reports said he availed a cooperative loan of Rs 11,000 in September, 2008, which mounted to Rs 12,198 with interest. Two days before his death Naik had also took a private loan of Rs 14,000 in his wife Aswani’s name on a promise to return Rs 300 a week. Aswini said her husband was under mental strain for poor crop yield this season and crumbling family economy. Besides his wife, Naik was looking after his visually-challenged father, a five-year-old son and two unmarried women relatives by cultivating 2.5 acres of virtually barren land. At times he worked as daily labourer. Attributing the suicide to poor crop yield and loan burden, Sundargarh District Congress president RK Sarangi demanded compensation of Rs 5 lakh to the bereaved family and employment assistance to the widow. Tahasildar Prahlad Pradhan said they are awaiting more information before drawing any conclusion, but admitted Naik suffered crop loss this season. An ex gratia of Rs 5,000 and rice for two months were provided to the family.

I remember we used to chant “अन्नदाता सुखी भवं| (Annadata Sukhi Bhavam, means the food donor/provider be always healthy and happy)” after lunch/dinner along with our grandfather. Nowadays I do not follow that. What a gratitude our grandparents (and ancestors) had for the labor that went before the food ready to eat. It includes farmers, labors, and cook, and now we don’t even bother to know about their condition and even dont recognize their existence.
Land lords and Sahukars (private money lenders)  keep exploiting the class in need and we don’t feel the necessity to raise voice against that because we dont feel the heat directly though we feel indirectly through inflation. This (our ignorance) is a pyre we are preparing (not only for farmers but) for ourselves and future generations because when the current generation’s 40% farmers are not willing to farm the food scarcity is inevitable. And to tell the fate of our future no astrologer is needed. So citizens wake and join the effort to stop atrocities on farmers. Report every exploitation/torture you hear/see, oppose wherever possible, help farmers as long as feasible.
जय भारत!

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat, Farmers face Atrocities, Indian Agriculture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

कृषी एक कला, कृषी एक संयम, कृषी एक समर्पण, कृषी एक आधार…

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on January 2, 2010


I think we need to discuss agriculture in its true perspective barring all the commercialization around it for time being. Because, I believe it such a profession in the world which is directly related to every soul on the face of earth.

Here is what I think:

“कृषी एक कला, कृषी एक संयम, कृषी एक समर्पण, कृषी एक आधार.”

1. कृषी एक कला [Farming is an Art]:

If we consider all the implications around farming, we can realize that Farming is one of very superior and rich form of art in the living world. Farmers have to consider natural calamities, water availability, need, budget, work capacity, labour management, sales, marketing and many more… It is difficult for any other profession to do all these jobs single-handedly. But now they are failing to do so why? Does this mean its an outdated art now?

2. कृषी एक संयम [Farming is Patience]:

When a farmer sows seeds, for example paddy/onion/wheat, he has to nurture the farm till it yields; that is somewhere around 4 months without any returns. Farmers just invest their resources be it money, time, efforts, heart… and wait till yielding day. But still they did it successfully in past. But now they are failing, why? Have they lost patience?

3. कृषी एक समर्पण [Farming is Devotion]:

At every rubbi/kharip season farmer prepares for another season by forgetting all failures and obstacles in past. Farmer gears up for the new inning with full devotion and dedication. The devotion and dedication are without any limits. Like farmer sales/mortgages everything to fund the crop expenses, sleeps in the field, eats in the field; with the hope that crop will yield good returns and then he/she can recover the investment. And they were successfully achieving the targets. But now they are failing to recover the capital too let aside the profit and their labour charges, why? Aren’t they dedicated and devoted any more?

4. कृषी एक आधार [Farming is a Support]:

In a true sense farming is the main support for living world. Farmers work in fields and produce much-needed food. [What they get in return is a well-known fact. Like free electricity, but only for 4Hrs a day, subsidy on swelled prices of seeds (earlier home-grown seed used to cost only Rs.10-15 per Kg and now the company manufactured costs Rs.2000 per Kg), which farmers never ask, but politicians do]. Think for a while what would happen if farmers start killing themselves like they are doing now(200000+ (0.2million) farmers have committed suicide since 1997). From where we would get the food to serve our daily needs? Earlier there wasn’t any need to think about their support as it was there and it is there now too. But nowadays farmers are loosing support from both community and government, why? have they stopped supporting us?

What will happen ifAlso the large scale survey shows that given a chance almost 40% farmers are willing to quit farming permanently this comes to reality? Read full article here.

“कृषितोनास्ति दुर्भिक्षं” – Dearth of farming is famine.

So I think for our own betterment we need to do some self-check to do the justice and extent our support towards the needy section of the society.

Open for discussion/comments.

जय भारत!

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Living with drought!! Is this a curse of Nature or ignorance by Bharat and Rajya Sarkar

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on December 8, 2009


While browsing through the India Together website I came across this report which says the tragedy of village dwellers, poor, especially farmers. The ignorance by Bharat sarkar is by and largely responsible for the sorrow condition of farmers.

******************* Excerpts from Kannan Kasturi’s Report **********************

**********************************************************************************
29 October 2009
-

Large parts of the country have had poor rainfall this year, and so the word ‘drought’ is on a lot of lips this these days, but in one part of India, it seems more permanent. Bundelkhand – the region of Central India between the Yamuna and the Narmada – has lived with drought for five of the last six years, the sole exception being 2008. The region’s 13 districts figure in all the lists of “most backward” districts compiled by the central government. People here are reportedly the beneficiaries of various schemes for drought mitigation.

I am traveling through this region, accompanying a group that has decided to come here to get first hand accounts of how farmers are coping with the drought. As we travel, I learn the lay of the land, and its history. Bundelkhand includes almost the entire course of the rivers Betwa, Dhasan and Ken. These flow down from the Vindhyas to confluence with the Yamuna and cradle the towns of Jhansi, Chhatarpur and Sagar, the diamond mines of Panna and the fabulous temples of Khajuraho. The region is united by its language – Bundeli – and a largely shared history and culture of over 1000 years but is divided administratively between Uttar Pradesh and Madhya Pradesh.

Our first stop is Mamna village in Hamirpur district of Uttar Pradesh, a settlement of about 10,000 people. We begin talking to a couple of villagers and soon a crowd gathers around us. With no irrigation available to them, the kharif crops are a total loss, say the villagers. They are struggling even for drinking water, sometimes having to transport it from a neighboring village. Harish Kumar has had a job card (guaranteeing him a job under the National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme) for 2 years at least. He was given some work for 1.5 months, and shows an injury sustained while working; however, he has not been paid. The date of registration on his job card has been overwritten twice to make it unclear when the card was issued. There are no work entries in the booklet.

Small farmers in Mamna Village, Hamirpur District, UP holding their 2 year old job cards. There are no work entries in their cards.

Seeing our interest in the job cards, the villagers collect over 10 job cards without any entries in a few minutes. They are all small farmers with a few bighas of land each, and willing to take up any work – but they say none is available. They show the compensation cheques they have got from the state government after the area has been declared drought affected – most are for Rs.250, less than 3 days’ wages, for the loss of their kharif crop.

Some steps away, Durjan Chamar, a cobbler in his late sixties, sits forlornly with his tools outside his house waiting for customers. His daughters have married and left home, and having no sons he and his wife have to continue the struggle for a livelihood. He has thepatta for three bighas of land given by the government, but as there is no water, there are no crops to be had. There are few customers for his skills in this village. He has tried to obtain work under the NREGA, but without success.

Basket weaving seems to be the sole non-farming related source of income in the village. Not just old men, even able bodied young men can be seen weaving daliyas (baskets) from dried stalks. The baskets fetch Rs.10 each and an old man we talk to says he can make only 3 baskets in a day. He receives no old age pension and is too old to take up any other work.

A large number of the small and marginal farmers have left the village in search of work. They travel to the nearby UP towns to work in brick kilns and to distant Delhi to work in the construction industry or in the factories in the NCR as unskilled labor or even driving rickshaws. We are told that a bus full of migrants from Mamna and neighboring villages has fallen into the Yamuna recently.

Durjan Chamar, a cobbler, displays his job card which has no work entries. There is no demand in the village for his skills and no produce from his 3 bigha land.

On a lane leading to the center of the village, a man sits in the front room of his thatched cottage running his sewing machine. He continues to work as we sit across on a charpoy and talk. His name is Jagdish he tells us, but everyone in the village calls him Bhikari Lal, a name used by his mother to shield her only child from evil eyes.

A farmer with 2 acres, he has turned to tailoring and leased his land for a 50 per cent share of the produce. The income from the land hardly counts. He has already spent a number of years in Kandla and is back now to look after his wife and two children after his mother passed away. He could earn Rs 300 per day in Gujarat, while back in the village, he can at best earn half that amount and the payment does not come easily as the villagers do not have ready cash. He is particular about the education of his children and sends them to a private school; the quality of teaching at the government school, he says, cannot be trusted.

……………………
We walk to a basti populated by the poor Raikwar community – people who traditionally work in water related occupations – to get a different picture. Swami Prasad has a job card that was made in January 2006. He has not got even a single day’s work till now. But it is not Swami Prasad alone. Everyone in a group that collects around us have the same story. Job cards are there, but no jobs. Only people close to the Pradhan get work, we hear. No Panchayat Inspector or Block CEO leave alone Collector has ever visited the community, according to these residents. Some of them have been out – to Delhi, Noida and Punjab – to look for jobs and come back after working a while. After Deepawali, some of them will head out again. More than half the people from this village of 10,000 have migrated outside the state seeking work.

A government school just across from where we are standing has a board displayed that declares the menu for the mid day meal each day – the menu includes rice, different dals and green and other vegetables. According to the residents, the children only get rice gruel. The open well in the colony has not been cleaned for ages and has been rendered unfit for use. It would cost just Rs.3000-4000 to clean the well and some people would have got jobs – but this is not a priority of the panchayat. The school has its own well. Residents have to wait for the school to open to lift their water.

Meghraj Singh in front of his hut. He has been denied a BPL card – so he can get no rations except Kerosene.

Adhiyara, a village in Chattarpur District has over 400 families split between the communities of Thakurs, Harijans and Adivasis. There are only 5 bore wells in the village of which 2 are private and one belongs to the school and one has been set up in the Harijan basti. The lone public bore well functions only when there is power. Sometimes, the village has no power for weeks. People are forced to go to neighboring villages for water, walking 2-3 km. In summer, if there is no electricity, women sometimes stand all night in line waiting for water.

At least 100 families have migrated to Delhi, Ludhiana, Punjab and other places, we are told. People with small children migrate with their entire family leaving behind an elderly person to look after their house and cattle. Many small farmers have given their land on lease to others for a fixed sum or a share of the crop. NREGA work is available only for 10-15 people and the Panchayat President distributes it among his friends, the residents allege.

Meghraj Singh has 7 acres of land and is one of three brothers. He is not entitled to a BPL card though he lives in a crude hut. His crop has completely failed. There are two ponds near the village with rain water that is used for watering the cows – but no irrigation is available for the fields. He says farming is unviable and that there are no alternate sources of employment.

The Adivasi hamlet of 20 families is at the far end of the village. Only a few emaciated old men are to be seen around – the younger men have apparently migrated. Their condition is pathetic – no job cards or jobs, no ration cards (BPL or APL), no pension, no compensation for crops lost. There is no government intervention here where the people are most in need. The only forest product available to them is Mahua. The only work is gathering tendu leaves for the forest contractors for which they are paid based on quantity of collection.

Nathu Singh, a farmer with 15 acres land in Adhiyara village, district Chhatarpur has only one plea – “Please tell them to solve our drinking water problem.”

Paglu tells us he owns 2 acres but they are useless to him. There is no work to be had in the village even with the bigger farmers. He has worked in cities but he doesn’t like it there and prefers to remain in his village. At one time, they used to hunt in the nearby forests but the government has taken away their firearm licenses.

On our way out of the village we meet Nathu Singh. He has 15 acres land. Lest we think he is prosperous, he quickly explains that he has a large family – 3 boys and 3 girls. One can see that he is but a shadow of his former proud self. He has only one plea – please, please tell the authorities to solve our drinking water problem.

All the villages we visit present the same story – complete crop failure for the small and marginal farmers who depended on the rains coupled with a lack of local employment opportunities. The much touted employment guarantee scheme of the government is not functional where it is most needed forcing large scale migration on the landless and even on small farmers. At close quarters, the picture of the panchayati raj is unedifying – viewed, as it is, as being all pervasively corrupt. The rains may have failed Bundelkhand but it is the governments of the two States, and at the Centre who have forsaken the people.

जय हिंद!

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

18% Vidarbha farmer suicides in 2009 genuine, says Bharat Sarkar

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on December 6, 2009


18% Vidarbha farmer suicides in 2009 genuine, says govt – Times Of India Pune

TNN 12 September 2009, 05:30am IST

AMRAVATI: The spate of farmer suicides is continuing in Vidarbha region. Hundreds of farmers have ended their lives this year but few have proved to be eligible to be counted as genuine cases, resulting in their kin not getting compensation or other benefits from the government. Activists claimed that the officials are merely following the orders from the chief minister’s office to keep farmer suicide numbers as low as possible. Though the situation has improved after implementation of the packages, the numbers are still worrying. In year 2009, till July 31, around 466 farmers in six suicide prone districts committed suicide. But only 86 – roughly 18.45% – were considered eligible for compensation which government offers to the next of kin. Ninety-six cases are under probe and 284 cases have been rejected by government. From 2001 to July 31 this year, 5,503 farmers committed suicide out of which 2,030 cases were found eligible for benefits of the government while 3,377 were non eligible and 96 are under investigation. Sources from the commissionerate stated that a compensation of Rs 1 lakh is provided to eligible beneficiaries of which Rs 30,000 paid in cash while Rs 70,000 deposited in the account of the farmer. Only those cases in which farmers committed suicide due to in indebtedness, excess follow up by a bank or moneylender for repayments and low yield are considered to be eligible for the compensation. The district collector heads a committee which comprises officials of the departments concerned and NGO representatives to review farmer suicide cases. Talathi of the village does the enquiry of the farmers on various grounds and then eligibility of the beneficiary is decided. Kishor Tiwari of Vidarbha Jan Andolan Samiti, while talking to TOI, claimed that Chief Minister Ashok Chavan himself had told officials not to show more number of beneficiaries on record and officials are following the orders. Tiwari also said that the administration has put forth the flimsy reasons to reject the case. “The administration is insensitive towards the problems of the farmers,” he said. The government issued a GR regarding non-eligible beneficiaries in February this year in which it was stated that the benefits of the Antyodaya Scheme should be extended to the widows of farmers who were not considered eligible for ex-gratia. “Except Yavatmal district, this scheme is not being implemented properly,” said Tiwari.

What do you think? Where are we going?

We have price rise on one side and farmer suicide on other, who is being benefited?

जय हिंद!

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat, Farmer's Suicides, Farmers face Atrocities | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

 
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