Krishi Desh

For Bharat and Bharati

Archive for October, 2010

Once upon a time…

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on October 9, 2010


 

courtesy: criticalstew.org

 

While getting regular updates on “Farmer’s Suicides” I realized at least 2 suicides reported in media (many go unnoticed or covered up by Govt agencies, as suicide rate accepted by NCRB is 1 suicide every 30 minutes, which do not include farm labours and women farmers). The time may not far, if suicides continue at this pace, when we will be telling next generation that “Once upon a time Bharat was a Farmers (an extinct species now) nation”

Govt, Human Rights activists, secularists feel agitated (PM loses his sleep, 1, 2) when there is unrest in a particular community due to self-created mess. But the same HR, Govt, (lame-duck) PM, pseudo-secularists are so ignorant and unmoved even after 200000+ suicides by farmers across the nation. (Interestingly the leading states on the suicide chart are either Congress led or in past had their govt for long time, ironically no one is pointing a finger towards them neither questioning their ability). Society either is no different, except some futile efforts here and there by few person,

 

Who care for us? Courtesy: sanjayswadesh.blogspot.com

 

Following are few examples to see the gravity and voracity of the problems.

… A debt-ridden cotton farmer allegedly committed suicide in Karimnagar district of Andhra Pradesh, police said today. …  in Veernapalli village … Kamatam Chandraiah (41) consumed an insecticide when heavy rains destroyed two acres of cotton crops, they said. Unable to repay the debts, the farmer took the extreme step and died on his way to the hospital, police said. Financiers had been demanding dues of Rs 1.5 lakh from Chandraiah for some time now, police added. Read more

There is just another to this.

The farmer Kalia Beriha, 22, resident of Tenganpali village, some 460 km from here, committed suicide by hanging himself from a tree Wednesday near his crop field, ….  He had taken a loan of Rs.45,000 from a local bank in the name of his father. He was under pressure after he didn’t repay it …. Read more

There one more very frustrating episode.

Jitu Bagdi is one of the three farmers — Yunus Sheikh and Gosai Das Patra being the two others — who have killed themselves in Ausgram in Burdwan district, which is also known as “Bengal’s granary.

Jitu’s widow, Rupa, whom I met recently, described her husband as quiet and honest. Munmun, his slip of a daughter, told me how, on returning from school, she had found her father writhing on the mud floor, frothing from the mouth. Barely conscious, he had asked Munmun not to raise the alarm, and instructed her that she and her brother should eat what their mother could give after he died. [This last statement shook to the core. I'm collapsed after seeing the tragedy. for CWG govt spent Rs 70000 crores which could have solved the farmer's problems once and for all]

If farmers of “Bengal’s Granary” are witnessing this fate then least can be said about rest of the nation.

Farmers in Burdwan, one of the 11 districts that have been declared drought-affected by the state government, have been inconvenienced further by the near-absence of irrigation facilities. One other reason, crucial to the three deaths in my view, was, however, underreported: the role that moneylenders and other dubious credit institutions play in farmer suicides. Rupa, who is ineligible for compensation under the widow pension scheme because she is under 40, had mentioned that after his crops failed, Jitu, a sharecropper, had been worried about repaying the sum — “Rs 32,000 at a monthly interest of 10 per cent” — that he had borrowed in the last two years. Creditors came calling often, and Jitu had been troubled by the thought of his family’s honor being sullied. Read more

If we look at the gravity of  issues and respective reports then we can easily make out reasons:

  1. Drought (Burdwan district)

  2. Excessive rain (Karimnagar district)

  3. Unable to repay loans due to regular crop failure (these are the visible symptoms of disease)

  4. Highest lending rates (8% per year for new home and 10% per month for farmers)

  5. Harassment for repayment (dubious institutions and pvt money lenders)

  6. Lack of awareness about available facilities and schemes due to red tapeism in bureaucracy.

  7. Micro finance institutes are also creating death trap instead of easing the burden. Their lending rates are from 24-36% per year. (I’ve firsthand experience of such MFIs and SHGs from my native village. These institutes, mostly run by politicians, get loan from govt at the rate from 4-8% per annum. A classic example of exploitation at the hands of politicians in name of development?)

What to make out of such suicides deaths (daylight murders?). Ruling class and  elites are not at all interested.

Solution:

  1. I propose to start a MFI which shall give loans to the farmers who will allow us to work with them on their farms.

  2. Farmers can avail consultation from us for cultivation with no extra cost.

  3. Modern agricultural techniques shall be provided.

  4. Only stringent norm shall be, to sell their crop through us at the market price or even at higher price (This will be given in a written guarantee. The quality check process shall be used to gauze quality of produce)

  5. The lending rate shall be no more than 1% per month reducing.

  6. All of the loans must be insured under various Govt, private insurance schemes.

  7. Eligibility shall be decided on crop and cultivation area basis.

Need an expert advice for above solution, please come forward to start analysis, planning for smooth and effective implementation of above solution.

कृषितोनास्ति दुर्भिक्षं- Dearth of Agriculture is Famine

Open for suggestions/comments.

Apeal:

If you feel interested then please be updated, stand up and take the pledge that you’ll join the forces by whatever way its possible for you.

P.S. Just liking/sharing the post or shading tears will not help (you must if you feel but) , please, help aggressively because these are the people who produces daily meal for us. We must care for them.

While getting regular updates “Farmer’s Suicides” I realized there are at least 2 suicides reported in media (many go unnoticed or covered up by Govt agencies, as suicide rate is 1 each 30 minutes)

Govt, Human Rights activists, seculars feel agitated (PM loses his sleep) whenever there is unrest in a particular community due to self created mess. But the same HR, Govt, (lame-duck) PM, pseudo-seculars are so ignorant and unmoved even after 200000+ suicides by farmers across the nation. (Interestingly the leading states on the suicide chart (http://krishidesh.wordpress.com/2010/01/11/farmers-deserve-life/) are either Congress led or in past had their govt for long time, ironically no one is pointing a finger towards them neither questioning their ability). Society either is no different, except some futile efforts here and there by individuals,

Following are few examples to see the gravity and voracity of the problems.

… A debt-ridden cotton farmer allegedly committed suicide in Karimnagar district of Andhra Pradesh, police said today. …  in Veernapalli village … Kamatam Chandraiah (41) consumed an insecticide when heavy rains destroyed two acres of cotton crops, they said. Unable to repay the debts, the farmer took the extreme step and died on his way to the hospital, police said. Financiers had been demanding dues of Rs 1.5 lakh from Chandraiah for quite some time now, police added. Read more http://ibnlive.in.com/generalnewsfeed/news/debtridden-cotton-farmer-ends-life-in-ap/388038.html

There is just another to this.

The farmer Kalia Beriha, 22, a resident of Tenganpali village, some 460 km from here, committed suicide by hanging himself from a tree Wednesday near his crop field, ….  He had taken a loan of Rs.45,000 from a local bank in the name of his father. He was under pressure after he failed to repay it …. Read more http://sify.com/news/villagers-block-road-over-farmer-s-suicide-news-national-kjxuageiajf.html

There one more very frustrating episode.

Jitu Bagdi is one of the three farmers — Yunus Sheikh and Gosai Das Patra being the two others — who have killed themselves in Ausgram in Burdwan district, which is also known as “Bengal’s granary.

Jitu’s widow, Rupa, whom I met recently, described her husband as quiet and honest. Munmun, his slip of a daughter, told me how, on returning from school, she had found her father writhing on the mud floor, frothing from the mouth. Barely conscious, he had asked Munmun not to raise the alarm, and instructed her that she and her brother should eat what their mother could provide after he died.

If farmers of “Bengal’s Granary” are witnessing this fate then least can be said about rest of the nation.

Farmers in Burdwan, one of the 11 districts that have been declared drought-affected by the state government, have been inconvenienced further by the near-absence of irrigation facilities. One other factor, crucial to each of the three deaths in my view, was, however, underreported: the role that moneylenders and other dubious credit institutions play in farmer suicides. Rupa, who is ineligible for compensation under the widow pension scheme because she is under 40, had mentioned that after his crops failed, Jitu, a sharecropper, had been worried about repaying the sum — “Rs 32,000 at a monthly interest of 10 per cent” — that he had borrowed in the last two years. Creditors came calling often, and Jitu had been troubled by the thought of his family’s honor being sullied. Read more http://www.telegraphindia.com/1101007/jsp/opinion/story_12987186.jsp

What to make out of such suicides deaths (daylight murders?). Ruling class elites are not at all interested. If you are interested then please be updated, stand up and take the pledge that you’ll join the forces by whatever way its possible for you.

If we look at the gravity of the issues and respective reports then we can easily make out reasons:

  1. Drought (Burdwan district)

  2. Excessive rain (Karimnagar district)

  3. Unable to repay loans due to regular crop failure (these are the visible symptoms of disease)

  4. Highest lending rates (8% per year for new home and 10% per month for farmers)

  5. Harassment for repayment (dubious institutions and pvt money lenders)

  6. Lack of awareness about available facilities and schemes due red tapeism in bureaucracy.

  7. Micro finance institutes are also creating death trap instead of easing the burden. Their lending rates are from 24-36% per year. (I’ve firsthand experience of such MFIs and SHGs from my native village. These institutes, mostly run by politicians, get loan from govt at the rate from 4-8% per annum. A classic example of exploitation at the hands of politicians in name of development?)

Solution:

  1. I propose to start a MFI which shall provide loans to the farmers who will allow us to work with them on their farms.

  2. Farmers can avail consultation from us for cultivation with no extra cost.

  3. Modern agricultural techniques shall be provided.

  4. Only stringent norm shall be, to sale their crop through us at the market price or even at higher price (This will be given in a written guarantee. The quality check process will be used to gauze the quality of produce)

  5. The lending rate shall be no more than 1% per month reducing.

  6. All of the loans must be insured under various Govt, private insurance schemes.

  7. Eligibility shall be decided on crop and cultivation area basis.

Need an expert advice for above solution please come forward to start implement this activity.

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »

Excellent poem inscription in an ancient temple

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on October 7, 2010


 

I read following poem on the backside of “Pingalavel” story book of GA Kulkarni.

Stranger, think long before you enter,

For those corridors amuse not passing travelers.

But if you enter, keep your voice to yourself.

Nor should you tinkle and toll your tongue.

These columns rose not, for the such as you.

But for those urgent pilgrim feel that wander

On lonely ways, seeking the roots of rootless trees.

Pride of Bharat

The earth has many flowery roads; choose one

That pleases your whim, and gods be with you.

But now leave! – leave me to my dark green solitude

Which like the deep dream world of the sea

Has its moving shapes; corals; ancient coins;

Carved urns and ruins of ancient ships and gods;

And mermaids, with flowing golden hair

That charm a patch of silent darkness

Into singing sunlight

 

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

CWG – Condom, Women and Games

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on October 5, 2010


Prostitution is being promoted by installing condom vending machines on CWG venue in order to cater to the need of visitors. This is disgusting.

Is this only way remainded in hands of UPA to portray Bharat to visitors? Aren’t there any other things which will avoid sexual exploitation? Condoms may avoid pregnancy, but will it avoid sexual exploitation?

Foreign Visitors flow will boost the sex demand – http://gulfnews.com/news/world/india/foreign-visitors-flowing-into-new-delhi-1.673739

Many teenage girls would be forced to sex trade – http://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/index.php/news/content/view/full/94097

CWG encouraging prostitution: Aiyar – http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/sports/events-tournaments/commonwealth-games/top-stories/CWG-encouraging-prostitution-Aiyar/articleshow/6390291.cms

Activists in Delhi urge calling off CWG – (‘Girls are being trafficked from states like Tamil Nadu, Orissa, Jharkhand, and Rajasthan and are being turned into prostitutes,)http://sify.com/news/activists-in-delhi-urge-calling-off-cwg-news-national-kims4ciegch.html

Mani rings sex trade bell – http://www.telegraphindia.com/1100904/jsp/frontpage/story_12895088.jsp

There is nothing wrong in having sex (adults only) but promoting it in the name of games is illogical and uncalled for. Is UPA playing a role of Pimp/Dalal?

जय भारत!

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat | 7 Comments »

What will I do with the money? Eat it? – A farmer

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on October 1, 2010


Industrializing India leaves little room for farmers

Courtesy- (Reuters)

Jagdishji Vaghela is one of hundreds of thousands of farmers standing in the way of India’s breakneck economic expansion.

Determined not to give up his land for an industrial park in the western state of Gujarat, the 55-year-old farmer scorns at talk of how the benefits of industrialization in Asia’s third-largest economy will trickle down to people like him.

Despite a nearby plant producing what is touted as the world’s cheapest car, he pointed to a water-logged track leading to his village. “What is this development they are talking about? Look at the road, it’s completely flooded,” Vaghela said.

“I won’t give it (land) away. If we give it what do we do? We will have to search for jobs, but even they are not available.”

As India industrializes rapidly, resistance from farmers such as Vaghela and rows over acquisition of farmland for industry have become a sensitive issue in a country where two-thirds of the 1.2 billion population is dependent on agriculture.

But Vaghela knows his options are limited.

Farm income is declining, his crops have repeatedly failed and if he holds out too long, he risks having the land lose its value as it remains a land-locked enclave between factories.

The uncertain future he and other farmers like him across the country face has led to a string of violent protests against attempts to acquire land for factories, power plants or roads, posing a risk to India’s economic ambitions.

“The bigger picture is that land is an issue. It is one of those areas that India needs to up its game,” Kevin Grice, senior international economist at Capital Economics in London, said.

“India scores relatively poorly and it is due to micro issues like land, red tape and cumbersome laws,” he said, referring to India’s 133 position in the World Bank’s ranking of ease of doing business.

While few believe foreign interest in India will taper off, these issues could delay a much needed acceleration in the amount of foreign investment pouring into the country.

BREWING DISCONTENT

How India soothes the discontent brewing amongst the tens of thousands of farmers may determine the economic and political future of the country where the rural population is a crucial vote base for both ruling and opposition parties.

Mindful of the social and security concerns, top ruling politicians have said acquisitions should skirt fertile and productive land, and farmers ought to be adequately compensated and offered alternate jobs.

The issue may become a political hot potato this year, with the ruling Congress party championing farmers despite clamor from industry and investors to make it easier to acquire land.

Vaghela says he and his fellow villagers had high hopes when Tata Motors decided to set up in Sanand the plant that builds the $2,500 Nano car, after huge protests forced India’s top vehicle maker to relocate in 2009 from West Bengal state.

“We had great expectations from the Nano plant, that we’d get money, we’d get jobs. But what has come out of it? None of our people have got jobs. We don’t have the qualifications.”

Protests can scupper projects, as Vedanta Resources discovered last month when the government shelved the UK-based miner’s $9.6-billion plan to mine bauxite on lands in the eastern state of Orissa held sacred by indigenous groups.

Other high profile projects, like those by top steelmakers ArcelorMittal, POSCO and Tata Steel to set up mills, too have been held up as they face problems in getting land from farmers.

Under the current law, the state can take over any land for a public purpose with little compensation.

Protests against land acquisitions are not new in India, but have become more visible recently as the economy grows at its fastest pace ever and as income inequalities widen.

But there is growing realization that compensation must be adequate if industrialization has to proceed smoothly, with the government considering changes that will offer the owners market rates and even equity stakes in the industries being set up.

RISKS FOR INDUSTRY, GROWTH

Land promises to be a politically charged issue in crucial state elections this year and next, especially after the ruling Congress party backed farmers protesting against a highway being built on their lands in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh.

At Sanand, the government had initially faced protests, but much of it has calmed down after it hiked compensation by a third to nearly 4.86 million rupees ($105,000) per acre.

While this might be a fortune for many where annual per capita income is $3,100, the figure hides the fact there are many people dependent on the same plot of land and farmers have mortgaged land and racked up debt with usurious moneylenders.

In Siyawada village, Kanjibhai Parmar, the 60-year-old patriarch of a seven-member household, has just inked his approval for handing over nearly 13 acres of land.

Over two-thirds of that land is with a moneylender, whose dues have doubled to 600,000 rupees in two years. He borrowed the money after his crops failed repeatedly.

“The government has opened up one more way to survive, selling off our land. Else we would have mortgaged it,” he said. “With the money, we will repay our debt, buy a tractor and get land elsewhere.”

But for smaller farmers like 40-year-old Nanjibhai Karsanbhai, who has 12 family members on his 7-acre plot, there will be little left over to purchase land.

“I have no other land, I won’t give it up,” he said. “What will I do with the money? Eat it?”

Welcome your comments about the Industrialization and Agriculture in Bharat.
Jai Jawan, Jai Kisan.

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

Farming News in a Nutshell

Posted by संदीप नारायण शेळके on October 1, 2010


GM or Bt
Advanced and Modern farming
Farmer’s Inspirational stories:
Farm Crisis:
Economy and politics
Farmer Suicide:
More in later time. I’m writing a post on inspirational stories for farmers.
Jai Kisan, Jai Jawan!
Jai Bharat!

Posted in Agriculture of Bharat | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments »

 
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